Why You Shouldn’t Ask Your Web Designer to Super-Size Your Company Logo

25 June 2015

There are some instances where bigger is better. Yes, I’m talking about Big Mac meals, lottery wins and beds. Unfortunately, in the world of web design, it is not uncommon for companies to request that their logo is ‘bigger’.

Is a Large Logo Ever a Good Thing?

It is perfectly natural to think that a more prominent logo is bound to be a good thing. After all, bigger logos stand out more and you want customers to recognise your brand, right?  Actually, no, a super-sized logo is (mostly) not such a good thing.

Sometimes Big Is Good

To be fair BIG can work sometimes. Thinking back to Big Mac meals, would you fall victim to the lure of a drive-thru meal so often if the iconic golden arches of McDonalds were not quite so prominent on the horizon in every town and city across the world? Probably not.

In the above example, a BIG logo is effective, but for the majority of companies, it can be distracting and here’s why:

  • Your website visitors can see the current logo perfectly well – they don’t need to have it forced upon them.
  • Why take up a large amount of screen space with something that doesn’t provide value?
  • Large logos can detract from the important stuff, such as a great new offer or product.
  • Branding is more than a logo and focussing too much on a logo can hurt your brand.

We completely understand why you might think a bigger logo will help your brand, but if you want your website to offer value and serve your customers better, in most cases we would suggest not making your logo large and oversized. Websites are supposed to attract a customer, and an oversized logo can detracted from this. Imagine how uncool Apple products would look if the Apple logo was three times larger?

If you’re still unconvinced and are looking for a solution to increase your logo size you might want to try some Make My Logo Bigger Cream. For further information on this procut take a look at the video below. *Caution this video contains some elements of satirical humour*